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TOYOTA CONNECT


MAGICAL MYANMAR


After 50 years of isolation, Myanmar – formerly known as Burma – began opening up to tourists in 2012. Because the tourism industry’s still developing, the country offers a very authentic


travel experience, with locals wearing traditional garments and no Western franchises in sight. The most famous landmark is Bagan, a mythical ancient city which is home to more than


2 000 breathtaking Buddhist temples, pagodas and stupas towering over green plains. You can explore this archeological wonder by renting a bicycle and getting lost in the magnificent maze of monuments.


The best way to witness the sheer scale of


the archeological site is by floating above the monuments in a hot-air balloon – preferably at dawn or sunset.


Visit: www.visit-bagan.com


ALADDIN’S CAVE


Son Doong, the world’s biggest cave, is situated in central Vietnam. At over 8,8km long, it’s so large that it’s home to a jungle and a river and could fit a 40-storey skyscraper within its walls!


While a local man discovered the entrance to the cave in 1991, British cavers were the first to explore it in 2009. Tour company Oxalis began running trail tours of the cave a few years later.


It takes six days and a team of more than 25 porters, safety experts and


guides to traverse the length of the cave. The landscape’s truly otherworldly, with gigantic stalagmites, stalactites and fascinating flora and fauna. The popular tour has a six-month waiting list.


For those seeking something more accessible, there are a number of caving tours in the region, including a 7km trek through Paradise Cave or a trip to Hang Toi (“Dark Cave”), which includes a kayak across a river and a swim to the deepest part of the cave. Visit: www.phong-nha-cave.com


SEAS THE DAY! Ideally situated at stunning Seaforth


Beach in Simon’s Town, Cape Town, within the ecologically diverse Table Mountain National Parks Boulders precinct, Shark Warrior Adventures offers a range of


adrenaline-charged activities. You can go on guided sea kayak safaris,


snorkel safaris and stand-up paddling


excursions, perfectly timed to enjoy the early-morning or sunset light.


These excursions enable you to paddle, kayak or snorkel through the enchanted


kelp forests, which are home to small sharks, protected fish species, dolphins, whales and rare marine life species.


Special events like a monthly full-moon paddle, combination tours and corporate team-building safaris are also on the menu. What’s more, Shark Warrior


Adventures is an eco-tourism project and a percentage of all trip fees go back into marine conservation projects run by AfriOceans Conservation Alliance. Visit: www.sharkwarrior.com


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