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TOYOTA CONNECT


MORE TOYOTAS ON


THE ROAD A grand total of 6 643 386 Toyota vehicles were sold in the nine months to 31 December 2016, up 150 602 units from the same period last year. The company’s financial results for


ESCAPING THE RAT RACE Last year Toyota announced its position


as the new headline sponsor for the series of Warrior obstacle races powered by Reebok. The series spans eight events across five provinces annually, with up to 8 000 participants per event making it SA’s largest and most challenging obstacle course race (OCR). “The upcoming Toyota Warrior series


promises to be Toyota’s muddiest sports partnership to date,” says Glenn Crompton, Vice-President of Marketing for Toyota SA. “Toyota’s always valued sport as a means of connecting with our audiences and we’re amped to get our hands dirty (literally!) by


venturing into the OCR sphere.” The partnership extends beyond the traditional corporate sponsorship and will feature a number of experiential elements at upcoming Warrior races: for example, a fleet of new Toyota vehicles will form part of the Warrior convoy responsible for erecting race obstacles on challenging off-road trails. Another highlight is that winners of the Black Ops Elite race will drive off in the latest-model Toyota RAV4, to keep until the next race. In addition, Toyota-owners attending events will be treated to prime parking spaces and have an opportunity to test-drive Toyota models. For more information about Warrior events for 2017, sign up at: www.warrior.co.za


NEVER SAY


the nine-month period show that despite selling more vehicles, net revenue of more than ¥20 trillion was down by 6% from the same period last year. The fall was partly due to currency fluctuations and increased expenses. For the fiscal year ending 31 March


2017, Toyota increased its sales forecast from 8,85 million vehicles to 8,90 million – and sales remain buoyant.


“NEVER”! In addition to its sponsorship of the Warrior races, Toyota’s drawn up a vehicle sponsorship agreement with the KeyHealth Nevarest team, who were identified as being among SA’s leading OCR and Adventure Racing competitors. Nevarest Team members scooped more than 154 podium positions in local and international adventure racing events in 2016.


The team also specialises in a variety of disciplines, including mountain-


biking, canoeing, trail-running, triathlon and duathlon events. In addition to having competitors wear Toyota-emblazoned race kit at


upcoming adventure races, the sponsorship agreement allows the young athletes to own and drive Toyota vehicles of their choice. “Much like our vehicles, the team has proven their terrain-adaptability. Their agility and toughness are the ideal match for the vehicles driving the team, going forward,” says Glenn Crompton, Vice-President of Marketing for Toyota SA.


BOTH SEXES In a survey conducted by Gumtree SA on the differences between men and women when buying a car, Toyota was voted the preferred brand by both sexes. Ladies love Toyota for its


SCORING WITH


reliability, easy maintenance, comfort and affordability. Men admire the power, style,


class, engineering and trustworthiness of the brand. It’s great to know that Toyota isn’t fuelling the eternal battle of the sexes and, instead, is capturing hearts on both sides!


12


© Daniel Coetzee


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