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ON THE MOVE


DESIGN YOUR DREAM The next generation of car designers may well emerge from SA after local


youngsters entered Toyota’s global art contest to draw their dream car. The competition was open to children aged under eight, eight to 11 and 12-15. Excited kids across the country are now waiting to hear who’s won the top


prize of R10 000 in each category, with gadgets and gifts for four runners-up in each age group. Special Award-winners will have the excitement of flying to the international awards ceremony in Japan in August. If your kids missed the competition this year, look out for details about next year’s competition.


Right: Glenn Crompton (right), Vice-President of Marketing for Toyota SA, awards one of the contestants.


QUIRKY APPEAL It sounds like an odd sales tactic, but Toyota is targeting customers


who don’t like its vehicles with the new C-HR. “If you like it, you love it. If you don’t like it, you never will,” says Hiroyuki Koba, GM of the C-HR. “We’re looking for customers who disliked Toyota before. We want to turn their heads.” The name is an abbreviation of Coupé High Rider, emphasising


that its driving dynamics match those of a compact hatchback, despite its higher centre of gravity. Toyota expects the 1,8-litre petrol- electric hybrid – which is cleaner and more economical than the average car – to prove particularly popular.


HEARING AND HEALING The organisation Music & Memory,


which helps people overcome cognitive and physical challenges through music, has received a donation of US$10 000 from Toyota. The Music & Memory Programme


creates personalised, digitised music selections for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and other cognitive problems. By giving patients iPods filled with their favourite songs or familiar music, the programme uses the power of music to help engage and support memory retrieval. Patients who were previously remote, disengaged and completely unresponsive can become animated, tap, sway and sing to their favourite rhythms, answer questions lucidly and hold rational conversations.


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